Information applicable for Australia and New Zealand. For other countries, please contact your local Cochlear office for further information.

Questions about a Baha?

Anyone considering a surgical procedure is naturally concerned about the outcomes. Below are questions which are most often asked by those considering a Baha.

These questions and answers have been provided by Wendy Jansz, a Baha recipient. If you have other queries please feel free to contact her by clicking the "Contact Me" menu button.

For additional information, technical enquiries or advice please contact Cochlear Limited on 1800 620 929 (Toll Free) or visit the Cochlear website by clicking the menu botton, or email: Cochlear customer Service for information or go to Baha Clinic Finder.

Find a Baha Clinic near you

Q

Why would someone need a Baha?

A
A Baha can be an effective hearing solution for people with the following impairments:
  • Bilateral conductive hearing loss
  • Congenital ear malformations
  • Single sided deafness (SSD)
  • Hearing loss where air conduction hearing aids are not an option due to chronic conditions of outer ear.
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Q

How does a Baha work?

A
A Baha is the only implanted hearing treatment which works through direct bone conduction by combining a sound processor with a small titanium implant placed behind the ear. This system allows sound to be conducted through the skull bypassing the ear canal and middle ear. The Baha helps to overcome many of the drawbacks of a conventional bone conduction hearing aid by providing a direct transmission pathway to the cochlear.
Click on this link for more information about how a Cochlear Baha works
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Q

How well will I hear with a Baha?

A
How well you hear may depend on many factors. First of all, be well informed. Ask your surgeons what you can expect, then with the right expectations, be motivated to get the best result for yourself before going ahead.
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Q

Will I be able to hear music with a Cochlear Baha?

A
Many Baha recipients enjoy and appreciate music. However, because music is comprised of complex sounds, there are factors which may influence progress, such as prior experience with music, motivation and practise.
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Q

Will the Baha breakdown?

A
The Baha is after all a computer and computers sometimes break down but Cochlear is committed to product reliability and guarantees lifelong support.
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Q

Will I have to limit my sports activity? How about swimming?

A
A Cochlear Baha will not limit swimming. The abutment is not affected by water, but you need to to remove the external sound processor (as you would a hearing aid) and of course, when you're not wearing the Baha external device, you will not be able to hear from that side. For active or contact sports, you should wear a helmet to protect your abutment and the Baha sound processor.
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Q

Are there any adaptors or accessories I can use with a Baha?

A
An audio accessories adaptor is available for the Baha which allows direct audio input. There are many other accessory options for the different Baha devices and it is best to discuss these options with your Baha professionals.
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Q

Can anyone at any age have a Baha?

A
While there is no specific age barrier (either young or old) for having a Baha, bone quality is an important factor that needs to be considered.It is best to discuss this with your hearing health professional.
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Q

What about future Baha technology - will I be able to access it?

A
New sound processor technology will always be developed and Cochlear makes the committment to making this technology backwards compatible. That means recipients of previous generation technology will be able to access and upgrade to these advances. Bahas technology is built into the external processor and this allows for easy upgrades.
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Q

How long does surgery take?

A
The surgery is routine in nature and most people experience only minimal discomfort. It takes no more than two hours under general anesthesia. Most people are discharged on the same day or the day after and return to normal activities within a few days to a week. Your surgeon will tell you more about the process when you meet with him.
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Q

What happens during surgery?

A
It is better to discuss this with your surgeon.
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Q

What should I expect after surgery?

A
Time must be taken for the abutment to settle and heal. The external part of the Baha, the sound processor, will be fitted around 2 to 3 months after surgery. How well you hear may depend on many factors.
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Q

What are the risks of surgery?

A
There is a risk with all surgical procedures and it is important to discuss this with your surgeon. Some risks will be those applicable to any surgery performed under general anesthesia while others will be specific to the Baha process and the recipient's individual medical history.
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Q

What are the costs of the Baha? Will my Health Fund cover it?

A
Costs include the cost of the implant system; surgical costs, pre and post implant assessment and support. In Australia, individuals with private health cover are advised to check with their health fund. For non-private patients, it is best to discuss the options with your surgeon.
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Q

What are the steps to having a Baha?

A
  • Step 1: Make an appointment with a Baha Clinic
  • Step 2: Your surgeon will complete a medical evaluation to make sure a Baha will suit your kind of deafness
  • Step 3: You will then see a Baha audiologist and trial the Baha
  • Step 4: Your surgeon/clinic will schedule your operation
  • Step 5: The site will heal and then 2-3 months after surgery you receive your Baha processor.
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